Discrimination For Immigration Status or National Origin

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Ask questions and get answers, in real time, right here on the Internet, from live law librarians throughout California.

If you cannot afford the filing fee or other court costs, you may qualify to have these fees and costs waived by the court.

Whatever the reason, you have the right to represent yourself, to be your own lawyer in all cases in California.

This section will give you general guidelines for how to best prepare yourself for court.

The Constitution; Executive and Administrative Laws; County, Appellate, Supreme Court, and Federal Districts; State Legislation; and Legal Guides.

To legally hire any employee in the United States, an employer must be able to verify that the applicant is eligible to work in the United States. You must prove that you are eligible to work. Employers are required to complete a Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, to record verification that you showed the employer documents that prove you are authorized to work in the United States.

Everyone inside the U.S. has certain legal rights, regardless of your immigration status.

This interactive map and search engine that will help you find legal assistance near you.

Field Offices handle scheduled interviews on non-asylum related applications.

Language discrimination occurs when a person is treated differently because of her native language or other characteristics of her language skills. If you need further legal advice or assistance, or think you may have suffered language-based discrimination, please call the Language Rights Information Line (800) 864-1664, a free service of Legal Aid at Work.

Alphabetical Listing of Resources

Basic information about living in the United States and finding services.

You may file an appeal on some unfavorable decisions to the USCIS Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) or the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA).

Find out how to acquire assistance and government benefit from FEMA's website.

Options for DACA holders whose driver’s licenses expire when their DACA expires

No one can be denied equal employment opportunity because of birthplace, ancestry, culture, linguistic characteristics common to a specific ethnic group, or accent.

Federal laws prohibit discrimination based on a person's national origin, race, color, religion, disability, sex, and familial status. Laws prohibiting national origin discrimination make it illegal to discriminate because of a person's birthplace, ancestry, culture or language. Find out more at US Department of Justice's website.

The Attorney General's guide on avoiding scams targeting immigrants and their families in English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, Tagalog, and Vietnamese.

Federal law prohibits: 1) citizenship status discrimination in hiring, firing, or recruitment or referral for a fee, 2) national origin discrimination in hiring, firing, or recruitment or referral for a fee, 3) unfair documentary practices during the employment eligibility verification, Form I-9 and E-Verify, and 4) retaliation or intimidation. If you feel you have suffered one of these forms of discrimination, call US Department of Justice Worker Hotline: 1-800-255-7688.

Local police can't hold you to be taken to immigration custody.

Since 1986, the immigration law requires employers to only hire workers who have authorization by the U.S. government to work in this country. The law requires employers to check (verify) the identity and work eligibility of each employee. If you believe you have been discriminated against on the basis of immigration status or national origin, you may be able to file a charge against your employer. Your union or an advocate from an immigrant rights group may be able to help you with this charge. You can contact them at 1-800-255-7688 or, for TDD 1-800- 237-2515 (both numbers are free).

Check out these frequently asked questions to find your answer about TPS for Haitians.

Employers may not have the right to ask for your documents.