Evictions

Most Frequently Viewed Resources

Ask questions and get answers, in real time, right here on the Internet, from live law librarians throughout California.

If you cannot afford the filing fee or other court costs, you may qualify to have these fees and costs waived by the court.

Whatever the reason, you have the right to represent yourself, to be your own lawyer in all cases in California.

This resource will help you understand your responsibilities as the tenant in case your landlord has started the eviction process.

Reference materials on eviction case law.

The Constitution; Executive and Administrative Laws; County, Appellate, Supreme Court, and Federal Districts; State Legislation; and Legal Guides.

This section will give you general guidelines for how to best prepare yourself for court.

What the RSO covers: allowable rent increases, registration of rental units, legal reasons for eviction, and types of evictions requiring payment of tenant relocation assistance.

ADR is usually less formal, less expensive, and less time-consuming than a trial.

The legal way to give formal notice is to have the other side "served" with a copy of the paperwork that you have filed with the court.

This resource provides general instructions regarding the eviction process inside or outside the court.

If your landlord wants to evict you, he or she must file a court case against you called an “unlawful detainer.” The landlord must have someone serve you (give you) the court papers called a “Summons” and “Complaint.”

Rent Control, Buyouts, Condo & TIC Conversions, Habitability & Repairs, Harassment by Landlord, Sales of Buildings, Security Deposits, Short-Term Rentals

The California Department of Consumer Affairs offers an overview regarding the eviction legal process.

Check out California Court's self-help resource on eviction.

Tenants have rights even when a home is foreclosed and changes owners.

Topics such as: repair issues; security deposits; interest on security deposits, and the rent board fee; eviction issues; landlord petitions and passthroughs tenant petitions; annual allowable rent increases and banked rent increases; hearings, mediations and appeals; utility passthroughs; water revenue bond passthroughs.

Alphabetical Listing of Resources

This video clip provides information regarding the options available to resolve disputes between landlords and tenants. The video clip consists of five chapters organized in an automatic playlist.

Protections for residents and causes for evictions.

Such as security deposits, rent increases, roommates, and evictions.

No. It is illegal for a landlord to lockout a tenant (renter), remove a tenant’s belongings, cut off utilities (such as water or electricity), or remove outside windows or doors in order to force a tenant to leave.

The law limits excessive rent, reasons for evictions, and rent increases.

Only basic information from this student-run organization.